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Achievers

Wendy Fisher: looking for the light

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“There’s a crack in everything. That’s how the light gets in.”

The words of the late Leonard Cohen never fail to invigorate Wendy Fisher. An avid artisan and philanthropic powerhouse, she seeks out the light in the bleakest of times, striving to uplift not just herself, but those who are struggling most.

For this reason, Fisher received the Humanitarian Award in honour of the late Chief Rabbi Cyril Harris at the Absa Jewish Achiever Awards this past Sunday.

Those who have witnessed her passion for philanthropy lauded her via video, including her father, the renowned Natie Kirsh.

“As a father, I’m expected to talk well of my daughter,” he said. “But I have something to say beyond what can be expected of a father.”

Kirsh said that Fisher wasn’t just a respected president of the Guggenheim Art Museum in New York, but also someone who had made a difference in the lives of thousands through an online university lecture programme she piloted earlier this year. Called Lockdown Academy, the project has given 3 000 people from around the globe a range of free and fascinating lectures every day.

“Wendy, I congratulate you on this award,” Kirsh said. “As your father, I’m proud of your achievements, and I believe that all your university listeners around the world join me in celebrating you receiving this honour. Well done Wendy.”

Fisher’s family and friends praised her commitment to others, listing her exhaustive array of philanthropic ventures aimed at uplifting and supporting the less fortunate.

“Wendy is South African, and her heart lives in South Africa,” said clinical psychologist, Dr Dorianne Weil. “She and her family found themselves in South Africa over the lockdown, and she offered herself and her resources in helping to uplift the many who were being affected by COVID-19.”

Fisher said she was humbled to receive an honour in the country where she feels most at home.

“Receiving this award made me reflect on my work over the past four decades, and how I’m directing my energy going forward,” she said. “This opportunity comes as we endure a global pandemic and the broader existential concerns it brings.”

In looking for inspiration to lead us forward, Fisher said she reflected on her youth, how she was raised, and how that influenced the path ahead.

“Coming of age in Swaziland was pivotal to who I am today. I remember our solitary house on the hill, the uneven dusty roads, and the bright starry nights. We didn’t have electricity in the early days, and had a fresh water tap in the garden.

“Our family values have always been to help others, so it was only natural that villagers came to retrieve fresh water from our tap. There are countless examples like this that left a lasting impression on my siblings and me, compelling us to continue to invest in community and philanthropy.”

Her parents’ values are imbedded in the family DNA, said Fisher.

“From my energetic, generous dad, Natie, I learned what it means to be a passionate visionary and entrepreneur,” she said. “His mantra is, ‘teach a man to fish’. People can build on the support you provide and become self-sustainable.”

From her mother, Frances, Fisher said she learned to prioritise family and look for opportunities to come together and really see each other.

“My mum’s wisdom is simply that when people sit and break bread together, their shared humanity is what’s felt, not their differences. Together with my siblings, we have carried the legacy of our parents forward, and I share this honour with them.”

Fisher encouraged others to seek their own inspiration as we look to the future.

“Teach a man to fish, to bring light where there is dark, to come together and build strong, vibrant cultures, and step up to help people in need,” she said.

“I hope you are inspired in your own journey to embrace our shared humanity for the benefit of all.”

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