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10,000 read of Rhodes, BDS & IAW debacles

Ten thousand reads (over 76,163 mins) – that is the amount of traffic the eight-week-old SAJR Online website has garnered in five days from a single story gone viral. Granted, it is not every day that Rhodes tries to fire a Jewish staffer for being pro-Zionist & Gay, or that such staggering revelations about and BDS and Israel Apartheid Week emerge. But this week there is a lot more to report… READ ON

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ANT KATZ

If you haven’t read these stories, do so now!


SAJR Online’s stories about the goings-on at Rhodes University last week have had an unexpectedly large amount of coverage. The subject – or victim – of the story, Larissa Klazinga (pictured at left with her partner Charlene Donald), told SAJR Online today that she had never doubted that it would have such an impact. 

“I know that there have been a lot of waves at Rhodes, and in Grahamstown generally,” she told the Jewish Report today. “I am not surprised at all.”

While the impact and reach of the stories on social media channels are impossible to gauge, LARISSA’S TALE, the story she wrote in her own words for SAJR Online, was read 5,822 times in just four days. Not only that, but it enjoyed an incredible average read time of eight minutes and 11 seconds – a massive figure for a story on a news website.

Larissa & Charlene2RIGHT: Larissa & Charlene
protesting NO HATE

The website’s own story on Larissa’s episode and other goings-on at Rhodes, RHODES PAYS DEARLY FOR ANTI-ZIONIST STAND, on SAJR Online has 3,622 reads over the same time with an average read time of almost seven minutes, while another associated story SAJR published at the same time, THE STORY THE BOARD DIDN’T WANT YOU TO READ was read 612 times with an average read time of just over six minutes.

This is 76,163 minutes (or 1,269 hours) of time users were on the site reading only these three stories and only over five days. The razzmatazz over these stories has not abated yet, if anything, it is increasing.

With up to 400 users coming on to the site per hour, reading these and other stories, posting comments, watching our ever-popular VIDEOS and checking our amazing digital and print archives, SAJR-Online had to take a decision to upgrade our server and broadband facilities for the fourth time in only eight weeks since its launch.

Related reads:

RHODES PAYS DEARLY FOR ANTI-ZIONIST STAND on SAJR Online

LARISSA’S TALE in her own words on SAJR Online

THE STORY THE BOARD DIDN’T WANT YOU TO READ on SAJR Online

OUTRAGE OVER ‘HOMOPHOBIA’ POSTERS on M&G Online

 

Tens of thousands have heard the parable

 
Apart from the thousands and thousands of users who have read the stories on the website, Jewish Report’s social media experts and Larissa herself say it has become a massive topic on Facebook too. And other media have also taken up the story.

SAJR on FACEBOOK has experienced a plethora of comments, the prize being from Jeanne Zaidel-Rudolph who posted two simple words: “Excellent exposé!”

Users were coming on at 400 per hour

So many users were on the website at a time over the past week – the highest recorded was 400 in one hour and 97 at one time – that the website experienced difficulties at times. So many comments were posted (all comments are moderated before publishing for obvious reasons) that the comments module is, at the time of writing, slightly unstable and not all comments that are approved to appear, are being displayed. 


Larissa & Charlene3Here are some highlights and lowlights of what SAJR Online users have had to say. The comments are shortened here and not all appear – to read all the comments go to
LARISSA’S TALE  and/or other featured stories on the topic.

VICTOR GORDON: You are an inspiration and unique example to all who stand for justice, sensibility and the upholding of the principles of democracy. Your fortitude in the face of such adversity in the interests of what you believe and cherish sets the benchmark of what should be expected from all of us who claim to have Israel’s interests at heart. We are indeed blessed to have someone of your obvious courage and integrity within our ranks.

STAN HORWITZ: It is indeed with great sadness that I read this and other related articles.

SIPHO RADEBE: I feel no sympathy for you and there will no longer be tolerance for the support of the Apartheid state of Israel is a cowardly pariah state and shall be treated as such. Good bye.

JEFF BLOCH: Sipho – do you have any idea of the reality of the Israeli Palestinian situation? You sound either misinformed or gullible – which is it?

ALEX SEPTEMBER: Now you kinda know what a Muslim feels like on a daily basis. Sucks doesn’t it?

FORMER RHODES STUDENT: Larissa’s comments, attitude and general treatment of students in her res who were either a) Muslim (which I am not by the way) or b) disagreed with her views on Israel was shameful. People who disagreed with her were shamed, disrespected and bullied.

Rhodes scene2ANON: Jeff, You will never convince the anti- Israel/Zionist faction of the reality of the Arab Israeli conflict. People like Sipho, and I’m sure their numbers are growing, will soon say that if Jews in S.africa are so Zionistic, why don’t they pack their bags, and go to Israel.

FORMER RHODES STUDENT: As a former Rhodes Student who lived in Larissa’s residence, I can say without hesitation that this story is wildly overexaggerated and completely one sided https://www.sajr.co.za/images/default-source/People/larissa-charlene1.jpg” />The only reason that you have the opinion that Rhodes is a safe place for gay people is because Larissa worked hard to make sure gay students always had someone to turn to for help. I’m really sorry other students won’t get the chance to have her as their warden. I’m shocked by this article and hope Rhodes gets a wake-up call.

FORMER COLLEAGUE: Whether or not one is a Zionist (and I am not), the way in which Larissa Klazinga has been treated by Rhodes University is a total disgrace! The events that have transpired make evident that academic freedom at the university is in jeopardy, and strongly suggest that the institution is being regulated and managed through an ethos of spying, threats and intolerance…. It is quite evidently a series of cooked-up-claims which would seem to be underpinned by homophobia. Rhodes conducted itself shamefully.

ARI: Your complaints are petty. Do you know how many universities in this place exclude or are unwilling to cater for us with particular disabilities? Or the fact that due to some courses require more equipment to make them accessible the uni just doesn’t have, and makes the disabled student leave the course? Get over yourself, grow up and appreciate the fact you can study without worse barriers.

JOHN ST JOHN: Seems that finding out you’re not part of the biggest victim group can indeed be heartwrenching, when you’ve built your career, sexuality, and life around that feeding trough identity. My heart would bleed, if I could summon even the smallest quantum of caring. I can’t.

LEON REICH: The saddest part of this story is that Larissa – an eminently capable woman – now finds herself jobless. She is prepared to take work anywhere in the country and if anyone would like to make contact with her in this regard, feel free to e-mail me at: leon@ccg-sa.co.za

 

EDITOR’S NOTE – We are experiencing a tech difficulty and further posts (see below) are not displaying as at the time of writing. We hope they will be there by the time you wish to read them HERE!

 

FORMER RHODES STUDENT: Hey “Another Ruth First Student”, it appears we were in res together then. To be clear, I loved Ruth First and was greatly involved in all aspects of res life while there for the TWO years I lived there. I loved the hall and many of the things Ruth First stood for. In fact I actively stood up for Larissa because those charges were really bogus. In my first year, I also deeply admired and respected Larissa.

However, that said, her Zionism and radical anti-Palestinian attitudes soon made me deeply uncomfortable and took away a lot of the joy of living in res. As you say, Larissa had very strong views and I’m sure as a former resident of Ruth First, you know that disagreeing with her meant a total isolation from the ‘inner circle’ as Larissa wielded her power very effectively in that sense. Yes, she taught students to stand up for themselves, but only if it was something she believed in. Those who she didn’t believe in and who didn’t believe in what she believed in, she mercilessly took down. Larissa had some good qualities for sure but I do believe her extremism got to her in the end and made life extremely uncomfortable for those who disagreed with her. 

ANON: “I didn’t ever think that it (being a zionist) was a controversial position, in fact, much like being “Proudly South African” it seemed like a no-brainer.” – Larissa Klazinga

Comparing pro-Israeli zionism (or any form of zionism for that matter) to being “proudly south african”, a no brainer? Seriously? The only way that would prove true would be if we were suddenly teleported back in time prior to 1994 in South Africa…  then she would definitely have a point. A no brainer indeed…

 

Larissa plagiarisedMail & Guardian

One particularly amusing anecdote is that of M&G THOUGHT-LEADER Gcobani Qambela who posted a blog titled “No love at Rhodes University?” which itself has had several thousand reads and numerous comments posted.

Gcobani kicks off with the widely used quote by Martin Niemöller that he says he loves: “First they came for the Socialists, and I did not speak out – because I was not a Socialist. Then they came for the Trade Unionists, and I did not speak out – because I was not a Trade Unionist. Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out – because I was not a Jew. Then they came for me — and there was no one left to speak for me.”

Gcobani Qambela continues that he was “reminded of this quote as I read Larissa Klazinga’s article in the SA Jewish Report titled: “Rhodes University: Not a Home for All”. I am not interested in much of Klazinga’s article per se but more the extent to which her story offers an important teachable moment about white masculinist racism, whiteness and privilege and how it is as harmful to white women as it is to black people.”

In essence, Gcobani is telling his readers that Larissa Klazinga’s story is one that is so similar to so many blacks in SA and “how it’s only when whiteness rejects them, that many white women start speaking out about exclusionary processes and silencing done by white men at predominantly white spaces like Rhodes.”

Larissa plagiariseHe goes on at length to reveal his own experiences. But, that aside, here is the anecdote-worthy parable.

Plagiarism of the worst kind

Enter an (apparent Israeli) blogger, STEPHEN DARORI, who lifts Gcobani Qambela’s piece off the M&G entirely, style and all, and publishes it under his OWN NAME the following day. No credit to Gcobani or the M&G. This is so scurrilous that the Jewish Report decided to visit Darori’s website on which he describes himself as the “developer of the Threshold Technolgy (sic) Curve Model” – whatever that may be.
 
On the day the Rhodes stories were published ChaiFM asked SAJR’s online editor to do an interview which can be heard here: PODCAST

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Kramer quits COVID advisory over “community flouting protocols”

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One of the community’s top COVID-19 advisors this week lashed out at the community for flouting rules and putting lives at risk. Professor Efraim Kramer said he could no longer contribute to the safety of the community during the pandemic in light of this brazen behaviour.

“In a nutshell, I’m fed up,” Kramer told the SA Jewish Report. He said while the first surge “brought out the best in the community”, the second wave “brought out the worst in us”. His frustration has been mounting for some weeks in light of the number of deaths in the community. Last week, two members of his family passed away from COVID-19.

“I don’t care if I upset people. My aim is just to save lives. I don’t want to implicate anybody. The final straw came this week when President Cyril Ramaphosa allowed faith gatherings to take place, and people went to shul the next day. Where was the consultation? No meetings were held on how best to re-open shuls.”

Kramer is the head of the Division of Emergency Medicine at the University of the Witwatersrand (Wits), and Professor of Sports Medicine at Pretoria University. He has specialised in emergency medicine for 30 years, and was FIFA’s tournament medical officer at the Soccer World Cup in 2018. Along with other experts, he has advised the office of the chief rabbi on matters related to COVID-19 and shuls.

“I have written at least eight different protocols for things like weddings, Barmitzvahs, yom tov [gatherings], and shuls and it seems that everyone is doing what they like,” he said. “Come December, in the middle of a raging pandemic, people got in their cars or on flights and headed straight for hotspots. They flew home knowing they were infected. The results have been devastating, people have died. We’ve done this to ourselves. We’re doing it to our own.”

He said the communal leadership was “paralysed”. In a strongly worded message he sent to Chief Rabbi Dr Warren Goldstein and members of the Union of Orthodox Synagogues, he wrote, “Please note, with regret, that I have withdrawn from all community COVID-19 commitments and communications due to the total disregard and ignoring of the various safety protocols developed for the shuls and the community by many. I will no longer consult on any COVID-19 issue because it generally amounts to nothing as most people are still intent on doing their own thing anyway, in spite of advice to the contrary. But then, who am I to give advice anyway.”

Kramer said he had received countless complaints from members of the community afraid to attend large simchas which had been taking place “as if things are normal”. On Wednesday, he received another complaint from a community member who lamented that while a caterer was following protocols, guests were dancing, hugging, and behaving as if it was a pre-COVID-19 wedding.

“I drive past a shul every day and see countless cars outside. There have been minyanim taking place. The shuls have relaxed their protocols. I went into a bakery last week, and things were haywire. People were on top of each other using the same tongs and there was no safe distancing. It was a disgrace. As a doctor, I can’t fight this anymore. I’m going back to hospitals where at least the patients appreciate what I’m doing.

“While many people are being very careful, there are those who don’t care about the next guy. They think they are ‘holier than thou’ and Hashem will listen to their prayers. When you add up all the incidences, you get a picture of a community that doesn’t care for one another anymore. And where is the leadership when this is happening? How come nothing was said when shuls continued to open when it was against the law to do so and unsafe?”

Barry Schoub, emeritus professor in virology at Wits and the former director of the National Institute for Communicable Diseases, said, “This is very disappointing news. Professor Kramer has been an absolutely invaluable member of our community medical advisory team and has devoted an incredible amount of his time and energy in drawing up protocols, inspecting shuls, and looking after the safety of functions. He is an international authority on mass gatherings and has world-class credentials which have been so valuable in managing the COVID-19 epidemic. I’m sad at the decision he has taken, but I do understand the intense frustration he is feeling at the attitudes he has come across in a small minority of our community and the disregarding of protocols to safeguard our community by a small minority of shuls and minyanim.”

Leading pulmonologist Dr Carron Zinman said she understood Kramer’s frustration. “We’re all frustrated by people’s complete disregard for safety protocols as it’s so simple to follow the rules. We’re absolutely exhausted, and are tired of watching people struggle for each and every breath knowing that they should have worn a mask/should have kept a safe distance/should have avoided the gathering, and could have avoided getting COVID-19. You realise that you can give the same advice till you’re blue in the face, and people will choose to do what they want. We don’t act as judge, and never compromise our standard of care, going all out to fight for our patients’ lives.”

Said Chief Rabbi Dr Warren Goldstein, “I was disappointed and surprised to receive Professor Kramer’s resignation on the eve of the president’s announcement allowing for the reopening of shuls, which have been closed for more than a month. I have asked to meet with Professor Kramer to understand his specific concerns because the reports I have received since the reopening of our shuls in August 2020 indicate that the overwhelming majority of shuls have been outstanding and totally dedicated to the implementation of the health and safety protocols drafted by our full medical team.

“As a community, we will continue to be guided by Professor Barry Schoub and Dr Richard Friedland, who remain on our medical team, as we go forward to ensure the highest standards of safety for our community. On behalf of our community, I want to thank Professor Kramer for his months of tireless volunteer work to train and prepare our shuls to function safely in this pandemic.”

Wendy Kahn, the executive director of the South African Jewish Board of Deputies, said, “We have no knowledge about Professor Kramer’s resignation or the reasons for it. We commend him for his amazing contribution to our community.”

Rabbi Yossi Chaikin, the chairperson of the South African Rabbinical Association, said he was “shocked, surprised, and upset” when he received Kramer’s message. “We are so grateful for his service, and he is so respected. He sat with every rabbi and advised us. And even though he was very strict, we listened to him!

“I know that all shuls have followed his protocols with proper distancing, screening, hand sanitising, and masks – this is being enforced. I also know there have been private minyanim not under our jurisdiction where I believe there were minimal to nil protocols. On behalf of the rabbonim and shuls, I say that we are doing the best we can. It’s sad that people have acted this way leading to this decision, but we will continue to be vigilant.”

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Joburg – city of architects and dreamers

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In spite of its reputation for being the “engine room” of the country, Johannesburg has many elegant, experimental buildings designed by Jewish architects.

Johannesburg Heritage Foundation’s Flo Bird and Brian McKechnie recently took viewers on a virtual tour of many of these buildings, downtown and uptown. Some of them have fallen into disrepair, but they are still a testament to innovation, and continue to contribute to the lives of those who live and work in them.

The tour, unusually, linked the buildings to their creators’ graves at Westpark Cemetery, with epitaphs contributing to our understanding of who they were.

“This tour was inspired by encountering the graves of architects whose work I loved,” Bird said, pointing out that a virtual tour allows us to traverse the large Westpark Jewish Cemetery with ease.

It started with Morrie (MJ) Jacob, who died in 1950. Jacob designed the Doornfontein Synagogue (1905) otherwise known as the Lions Shul, named for the bronze lions on either side of the stairs. In its day, Doornfontein was a desirable address for Jews. Though today the shul is squashed up against Joe Slovo Drive with an ugly fence, it’s still loved for its beauty and unusual touches like minarets, stone columns, and basilica-like space.

Another one of Jacob’s buildings, Cohn’s Pharmacy in Pageview (1906), is an example of the city’s obsession with corner buildings, which tended to be far more elegant and accentuated than those in the middle of the block. Jacob’s Jewish Guild War Memorial building in the old city centre (1922/23) is a pile of an Edwardian building which also celebrates its corner status.

Israel Wayburne (1983) is known, among other things, for employing famous activist and communist Rusty Bernstein. He’s responsible for a number of the maisonette flats (two down, two up) in Yeoville.

“Each building contributes to an interesting and varied landscape [compared, say, to monotonous Fourways],” said Bird.

One of his most well-known buildings is, in fact, the ohel at Westpark, which has a religious and aesthetic function (in spite of an unsightly drainpipe addition at the front). “Luckily Issie doesn’t have to see it as his grave is on the other side of the building,” Bird commented.

Louis Theodore Obel (1956), who was in partnership with his brother, Mark, was a graduate of the University of the Witwatersrand (Wits) – as were many of the architects mentioned. Obel and Obel made a great contribution to art deco architecture, including the Barbican Building (1930), which was the tallest building in Johannesburg at the time, Astor Mansions, one of Joburg’s first skyscrapers, and Beacon Royale flats (1934), at the bottom of Yeoville on Louis Botha Avenue.

Maurice Cowen (1990) contributed to the decorative facades of many of Joburg’s best-known schools, including Parktown Girls and Jeppe Boys, and the panels gracing 1930s-era Dunvegan Chambers, Roehampton Court, Shakespeare House, and Broadcast House in the Johannesburg CBD. The latter was the original home of the South African Broadcasting Corporation. The crazy antennae designed for the top of this building didn’t have any real function, McKechnie said, though it copied the antennae on top of the BBC, and there was briefly the idea of using it to dock airships.

Another Wits graduate, Leopold Grinker (1973), was an anti-establishment figure who disliked modernism. Grinker’s Normandie Court (1937) in Delvers Street, Newtown, combines art deco with his obsession with the streamlined form of ships. So too does Daventry Court in Killarney (also built in the 1930s), which was Killarney’s first modern block of flats.

Harold Leroith (also a Wits’ alma mater) is best known for designing Temple Emanuel in Parktown (1954). This minimalist, modern building has concrete recesses which make it sculptural and provide shade for its windows. It also shows concern for materials like stone and face brick.

Leroith also designed Redoma Court, which architects consider one of Johannesburg’s best buildings, and the iconic, shiplike San Remo (1937) Both are sadly in a dilapidated state in Yeoville.

Monty Sack, an architect and artist and another Wits graduate, (2009), incorporated the work of artists in Killarney Hills built on top of Killarney Ridge, built to house actors for the studio of American financier Isidore Schlesinger.

Sidney Abramowitch (2016) passionately lobbied to save Joburg’s historical buildings such as the Markham Building, and is known for designing Innes Chambers in 1963, now used by the National Prosecuting Authority. This unusual building with Y-shaped columns representing the scales of justice, was covered with mosaics, which recently had to be painstakingly restored.

Lastly, the tour touched on the work of Gerald Gordon (2016), also a Wits graduate, who the group described as “an outstanding brain who was unable to limit himself to any single factor”. Gordon, who incubated many of South Africa’s best-known architects in his many years of lecturing at Wits, is best known for designing mountain houses on Linksfield Ridge, such as 7 New Mountain Road (early 70s), which literally cling to the edges of cliffs.

He’s also known for developing a new construction method he named “thin-skin architecture” which uses no bricks and is extremely strong because of its monocoque construction (a type of construction used in cars and aeroplanes).

Like many others, the brilliance and bravery of these Jewish architects leaves a legacy that can’t be eradicated.

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Nominations open for a historic Jewish Achiever Awards

The Absa Jewish Achiever Awards 2020 is now open for nominations.

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JORDAN MOSHE

Just when you thought nothing familiar and fabulous was going to happen, the SA Jewish Report is calling you onboard to begin its journey to this year’s Absa Jewish Achiever Awards.

COVID-19 may have brought live entertainment and events to a grinding halt, but this year’s awards will be held in a format that will make history and give ample recognition to those who have achieved great things.

This is the 22nd year of this unique awards ceremony in which Jewish individuals are acknowledged for the powerful, influential, and life-changing roles they play in South Africa. The Absa Jewish Achiever Awards acknowledges those who deserve recognition for their contributions to society, paying tribute to the men and women who have enhanced our community.

Scheduled to take place in mid-October, the annual extravaganza evening will go ahead in spite of a host of virus-related challenges.

“For the first time in the event’s history, we will be holding an online-offline event,” says Howard Sackstein, the chairperson of the SA Jewish Report. “While the actual event will be streamed live for people to watch without being present, guests will still be able to take part in this incredible event.”

Sackstein explains that while tables can be purchased as usual, the seating is virtual, as guests will experience a gourmet dining experience in the comfort of their own homes while watching the live event.

“Those who buy tables will have their meal delivered to their home, from cocktails to dessert,” says Sackstein. “We will also feature a virtual red carpet, with guests taking photos of themselves at home and sharing them online.”

While they tuck into their meal at home, guests will enjoy a livestream of the event, enjoying the evening’s entertainment and awards.

The awards are another area where exciting changes have been made.

“While guests are eating and watching the event, award winners will be announced live and have their awards handed over to them at home by a team waiting to ring their doorbell. This means that guests will actually see the handover of the award, and feel as though they are still part of the event without actually being there.”

Some of the award categories have also been transformed. In spite of the challenges posed by our trying circumstances, members of our community remain determined to stand out and make tangible contributions, and the awards need to reflect this, Sackstein says.

“Beyond being online, the event must be experiential in that it is relevant to the times in which we are living,” he says.

“COVID-19 has ensured that the Absa Jewish Achiever Awards has changed, and certain award categories have been adjusted to reflect our reality. Business leadership in the time of COVID will replace the usual Business Leadership Award, the Professional Excellence award will become the Professional Excellence in COVID award. Other categories will be similarly adjusted.”

Changes like these are essential, Sackstein says.

“Awards which ignore our circumstances would be meaningless,” he says. “We have moved to recognise those doing remarkable work and their efforts at this very moment which are most relevant to our community.

“We are celebrating our heroes. Heroes emerge in moments like these. Ordinary people have really grasped the mantle of leadership and provided such a remarkable example that we should all emulate.”

Every member of our community is encouraged to participate in acknowledging the tremendous efforts of those who have risen to the occasion of COVID-19 and beyond.

“While a lot of people are depressed and fatalistic about our reality, others have seen the opportunities it offers and striven to make our lives so much better,” says Sackstein. “We have to recognise and celebrate them, using them as an example of what we can do in these difficult times.”

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