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The Jewish Report Editorial

No more double standards

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When the South African government hosts the foreign affairs minister of another country, it’s generally good news. When we welcome leadership from elsewhere, it mostly means increased co-operation between the two states, building relationships, and boosting trade.

In fact, in the past 18 months, in spite of the pandemic, we have hosted a number of leaders, including President Emmanuel Macron of France; Spanish secretary of state for foreign affairs, Cristina Gallach Figueras; Algerian Foreign Affairs Minister Sabri Boukadoum; Dr Lazarus McCarthy Chakwera, the president of the Republic of Malawi; and Lesotho Prime Minister Dr Moeketsi Majoro.

The countries we invite or simply welcome are varied, some being more or less important to us in terms of trade and bilateral agreements. Some official visitors are more or less impressive to host. Nevertheless, making friends and influencing other governments is generally a good sign in a country’s leadership.

Considering this, I would expect to be glad when South African International Relations and Cooperation Minister Dr Naledi Pandor hosted and welcomed with open arms the minister of foreign affairs and expatriates of the state of Palestine, Dr Riad Malki. It’s neither here nor there if such a country in fact exists. South Africa should be enhancing relationships with other leaders around the world.

However, it gets stuck in my throat when the same honour isn’t proffered to the leadership of Israel. In fact, our dear minister of international relations and cooperation is unlikely to be available for such a meeting even if it was hosted in her honour.

But yet, at the same time, she will have these warm and friendly meetings with this Palestinian leader, talking about peace in the Middle East and finding a two-state solution. This actually sounds wonderful, except that you cannot work towards peace by dealing with only one side. You cannot negotiate peace without both parties being given an equal platform, or am I somehow mistaken?

Let’s talk more about creating an equal platform. In their discussions, the foreign ministers of South African and ‘Palestine’ agreed to do all they could to remove Israel’s newly bestowed observer status at the African Union. Why, you may ask? Quite simply, to punish Israel. Is that a way of working towards peace between Israelis and Palestinians? I think not.

Then, while Pandor is going to welcome Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas for a state visit to South Africa, she wouldn’t be seen anywhere near the company of Israeli Prime Minister Naftali Bennett. And, the latter’s crime? None that I know of, but we would have to ask the very learned Dr Pandor.

The Palestinian and South African bilateral discussions also brought about agreement to host a Cape Town conference for Palestinian heads of missions in Africa this year where the “state of Palestine’s policy towards Africa” will be discussed and contemplated. What are the chances of our government hosting such a conference for Israelis? The truth is, in this instance, I’m sure holding such a conference for Israelis would be perfectly acceptable, only it would inspire a huge protest, and so on.

So, I repeat, government hosting this Palestinian leader is essentially good news, as is its hosting of most other leaders. However, it’s the double standards that irk me.

Though South Africa will entertain leaders from countries with horrific human-rights records, it won’t meet Israel. China is way up on this index, as is Libya, Syria, Iran, all of whom are friends of our government, but not Israel (which doesn’t really feature on this abusive list).

What’s so perplexing for me is that it seems like South Africa is being left behind with its anti-Israel sentiment – or can I go as far as calling it South Africa’s blind spot?

Most countries in the world recognise these days that a relationship with Israel can only be good for them. Israel is way ahead of so many countries in terms of technology, agriculture, science, and even medicine, that it’s worthwhile to maintain a good working relationship with it.

So many African countries with a good relationship with Israel have benefited hugely on numerous fronts, but South Africa cannot or will not consider this.

I totally understand that a country with a background of human-rights abuses would find it unconscionable to be friends with a country that commits human-rights abuses. If Israel was really such a country, then perhaps we wouldn’t have room to talk.

However, Israel is in the heart of the Middle East, nestled among a number of countries where human-rights abuses are horrific. And yet, South Africa picks this tiny country to put its pins into, ignoring the friends it has that commit human-rights abuses. I say it again: these are very convenient double standards!

I also understand looking out for Palestinian women and children who have been treated badly and made homeless. I feel for them, and wish I could help them. However, what about Afghan women and children? Or is it okay to abuse them or ignore the fact that they are being abused because it isn’t woke to protest against that?

I feel as if I have said this all before, and I know I have. However, somehow, it seems important to come back to it when our government’s double standards are being showcased once again when it comes to Israel and the Palestinians.

I can’t ignore it. We can’t ignore it.

The only solution is to make it clear that if the South African government or our foreign affairs minister is going to meet Palestinian leaders, then she needs to meet Israeli leaders. She needs to get to know the issues from both sides, to sit down and discuss them. Visit Israel. See for herself. Don’t take it from others. Do the research, and make up her own mind based on the facts.

It isn’t rocket science. It’s simply taking away the blinkers of prejudice and replacing them with the facts. We can help! Just say the word.

Shabbat Shalom!

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